Famous Residents

Chartist John Frost

John Frost was born in Newport, Wales, on 25th May, 1784. John's father died when he was a child and he was raised by his grandparents. After a brief period at school he became an apprentice boot maker to his grandfather. At the age of sixteen he left home and became a tailor in Cardiff. He then spent periods working as a tailor in Bristol and London. Frost returned to Newport in 1806 to start his own business.

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Charles Rolls

Lived in the Hendre, just outside the town, he was a keen racing cyclist, a highly accomplished mechanic, a pioneer motorist and an experienced balloonist and aviator. Rolls co-founded the Rolls-Royce Company and was the first man to make a non-stop crossing of the English Channel by aeroplane. He died in a flying accident at Bournemouth in 1910 and his statue stands in Agincourt Square.

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Horatio Lord Nelson

Two visits to the town by the great Admiral obviously left a great impression on Monmouthians since his death was drunk at their public gatherings for many years after he died. In the summer of 1802 he gave his approval to the Naval Temple on the Kymin Hill above the town, and dined in style at the old coaching Inn "The Beaufort" where he made a patriotic speech and praised the townsfolk for their loyalty to the King. Monmouth is home to a magnificent collection of Nelson material.

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Henry V

Born in Monmouth Castle in 1387, he is immortalized by his campaigns against the French and the remarkable victory at Agincourt. As a boy he loved outdoor pursuits and at the age of 10 he could ride, swim and bend a bow and hunt: he was a fine scholar, an accomplished musician, a chivalrous and bold monarch who proved to be a shrewd tactician - both militarily and politically. In addition to securing a temporary peace with France, Henry maintained control over the warring Owain Glyndwr whose armies sought to win territory in the Welsh Marches.

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Geoffrey of Monmouth

Born in 1090, Geoffrey came of a Breton family and appears to have been schooled in the town's priory before continuing his studies and work at Oxford. Here he was entrusted with the task of translating a very old manuscript from the ancient British language into Latin. From this and other sources he completed his "History of the British Kings" which contains references to Cymbaline and Lear, the coming of Christianity, the departure of the Romans and the exploits of the legendary King Arthur.

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